26January2015

Leslie's Latest NEWS

HAY IS FOR HORSES! 9 fundraisers scheduled in 2015 - 2017

 

RANCHO DEL SUENO in MADERA, CALIFORNIA

Welcomes LESLIE DESMOND to a unique Fundraising Event!

40222 Millstream Lane

Madera, CA 93636

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THE DATES AND TIMES!

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Sunday, April 5, 2015

Sunday May 10, 2015

Sunday, October 11, 2015

******

Sunday, February 28, 2016

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Sunday, September 25, 2016

*******

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Sunday March 26, 2017

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Rancho del Sueno is home to over 60 amazing horses whose genetics and ancestry can be directly traced to the arrival of European colonists, explorers, warriors and missionaries four centuries ago.

We enjoy the look, feel and performance of these horses and we hope that you will, too.

Leslie will retire from her current career as a horsemanship coach in December 2017.

For up-to-date information about the Leslie Desmond International School of Horsemanship 2015 - 2017 Apprenticeship Program,CLICK HERE.

ALL ARE WELCOME for Lunch at the ranch for a $10 donation


&

Dutch Treat Dinner in Fresno or Madera, depending . . . . !


SCHEDULE

9:00 -9:30 AM HORSES ARE OUR HERITAGE! Introduction by Robin Collins

9:30 AM - 12:30 PM  Demonstrationsof the Basic Feel & Release Techniques by Leslie Desmond

12:30 - 2:00 LUNCH SERVED AT THE RANCH!  Join us for an authentic Mexican midday feast!

2:00 - 4:30 PM Demonstration of Advanced (subtle) Feel & Release Techniques

Question and Answer and discussion with the public takes place

during the breaks between horses and after the meals.

Leslie contributes 50% of each day pass fee to RANCHO del SUENO to help defray the cost of feed, fencing and very costly recent unexpected
medical expenses.

If you need a tax-deductible contribution receipt please contact Robin Collins, owner, Rancho Del Sueno through the website listed here, or call
559-868-8681


Sunday, April 5, 2015

Sunday May 10, 2015

Sunday, October 11, 2015

******

Sunday, February 28, 2016

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Sunday, September 25, 2016

*******

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Sunday March 26, 2017

Sunday, December 17, 2017

THESE HORSES STILL NEED HAY NEXT MONTH!!

Rancho Del Sueno offers 9 Adult DAY PASSES for the Demonstration Series

withLeslie Desmond

Keep your proof of online payment, please, and present it requested at the door. Thanks!

Questions?

Contact: Robin Collins 559-868-8681

Barb Dean for Leslie Desmond Tel:602-228-7612| Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Thank you for pre-registering. We look forward to seeing you there!

Robin Collins and Leslie Desmond

 

Can you help a horse in transition today?

What can someone who loves horses do to help them?

 Ask your local horse rescue center, Humane Society or animal welfare organization if they are accepting volunteers to groom and clean, feed and transport horses, or give supervision and support to prospective owners while they “interview” their new horse. 

If these tasks don’t fit your qualifications, schedule or style, perhaps you can team up with someone to schedule a fundraiser for the organization with Leslie or one of Leslie’s recommended students / associates to benefit the unwanted horses in your area.

As soon as possible, they need to be paired up with appropriate new owners who will give them what they need in order to lead a healthy and happy life!

 

What can horse trainers and riding instructors do to help? 

Stable owners, trainers, 4-H and Pony Club leaders and riding coaches of all disciplines are encouraged to offer "how-to" instruction and coach volunteers while they get invaluable hands-on experience in horse handling through feel & release. Learning tools to help understand this approach are available through Leslie Desmond's International School of Horsemanship. (Inquire here: < This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >)

 

THERE IS URGENT NEEDS FOR the SMALL BUT IMPORTANT JOBS!

 

 

 Do you have a special skill and some extra time that you would be willing to share with us to help get horses placed and cared for even better in the interim?

Can you or someone you know who loves horses help local rescue and rehabilitation groups with saddle fit, farrier and barefoot hoofcare skills, equine dental care, advice on nutrition, leather craft, horse care, fence repair, haymaking, general maintenance, hand-walking, grooming, riding or transporting horses?

What about office management skills such as data entry, mailing list management, bulk mailings, graphic design, photography, digital media editing, fund raising, event coordination and marketing?

HORSES AND PONIES, MULES and DONKEYS WITHOUT HOMES NEED HELP in these areas and other ways. Your time, your thoughts, prayers, sweat will ensure a better future for many of them. It is always needed and greatly appreciated! Find out who’s doing what in your community and get involved! A horse lover whose dream finally comes true will never be the same again. . . .  and a happier horse will thank you for it!

 

Leslie Desmond

International School of Horsemanship, LLC

PO Box 1057

Great Barrington, MA 01230 USA

1-602-228-7612

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

www.lesliedesmond.com

www.facebook.com/thefeelofahorse

Dr. Robert Miller, DVM, praises Desmond's results with horses using Feel & Release

  From horse expert, Dr. Robert Miller, DVM:

"Dear Leslie,

      Your recent clinic overwhelmed me. Your ability to communicate your desires to the horses with no obvious signals, is extraordinary. You were able to get the horse's head to drop, look where you wanted it to, and to obtain movements in various directions in response to the vaguest of stimuli . . . .

      "You are doing a great job.  I call you the ’clinician’s clinician' "  . . . Regards, Bob 

Feel & Release, and its Importance to the Horse and Rider

Thoughts on Feel & Release and its Importance

 to the Horse & Rider

 

by Leslie Desmond

 

 Whether you are headed for a jump, riding a dressage test, gathering cattle, helping a child learn how to ride, or closing a gate from the saddle, the horse that understands your intent and feel will be there to do whatever is needed at the right time. 

A horse like this makes the best partner and will work very hard for your mutual benefit. If he is or isn't that partner, it is up to the person to help him become that partner. I love my job helping people to discover what a committed partner their horse can be and how to help him cultivate the inborn ability to be that way.

 As a riding coach and horse trainer, in almost three decades of travel around the world, I have met thousands of people and horses. What I have enjoyed most about this opportunity is the vast and intriguing range of different approaches people use when they are handling and riding horses. Incredibly, most of these approaches actually work! 

Horses have an astounding capacity to adapt well to different training methods, presentations and challenging situations. Effective techniques are too numerous to mention here, but there are countless variations in human presentation that horses can accept.

 While I have had some excellent coaches along the way, my search for new information to help me become a better coach continues. In recent years my focused effort to be a better student of the horses I work with has underscored much needed clarity about exactly what it is that a horse does and does not need from me in a given moment. This connection is more rewarding than I ever imagined it could be. Occasionally I take private lessons from friends who know more than I do about how horses work and what it takes to ride and handle them better than I do now. The other inspirational source of new knowledge comes from my own students directly. Their plateaus, questions, goals, and fears challenge me to re-think my old solutions to common and not-so-common training dilemmas. I’ve discovered that many approaches work, but I am convinced that the techniques that horses understands best are all woven together by a common thread called "feel".

A horse understands many kinds of feel, such as the direct feel of the weather on its body, a hand or brush on its face or shoulder, or the bridle rein against the neck and a leg against the ribs. A horse also understands indirect feel, which includes things like variations of body language, the human voice, and also our emotions like joy, fear, sadness and anxiety, and yes, even our thoughts. Another kind of indirect feel that is of great importance to the horse is his perception of the way shared spaces are used. Examples of this include the pace and sound of a human footfall approaching or going away from him, the speed and feel of our other movements, as well as more subtle things like our core focus, line of sight, posture and the way we use our arms and hands, legs and feet in relation to the horse’s eye, withers, ribs and hips during ground exercises. 

All of these aspects of ourselves that we bring to the horse register  in the horse's mind and can influence his decision about how, where, if and when to move his body. These subtle effects on the horse also apply when the rider is mounted; they combine to become the foundation for solid advancement.

It is important to remember that most refined maneuvers can astonish onlookers into fantasizing about the handler or rider in terms of "horse-whispering" and "magic" but, actually, the horse's physical reactions are rooted in its instinctive ability to read a person's intentions clearly. The horse can read human intent and emotion better and faster than most people can read a line in a newspaper. 

The horse's capacity to optimize this incredibly intuitive aspect of his nature is his instinct for self-preservation.  His instinct for self-preservation is the key to everything that concerns him.  It is the key to understanding his ability to know who is around him, what other creatures may be near -- be it another horse or cow, a person, dog, wolf, or other natural enemy.  Self-preservation is the source of his ability to know what other beings are thinking or wanting him to do, expecting him to do, or fearing that he might or will do.  

I hope that all horse owners and trainers will soon decide to give top consideration to this aspect of the horse's inner makeup in their efforts to communicate with him clearly and fairly. I believe this is something anyone involved with a horse will benefit from learning especially if they also commit to using feel and release.

With feel-and-release-based training techniques and the right blend of philosophy and horse health-and-hoof care my students form very close bonds with their horses.  And, for those who already have established a partnership with their horses, these new connections are strengthened as the "same-old" routines are phased out and new communication skills and adventures are welcomed in.

As stand-alone goals, horse handling techniques mean little to the horse until they are presented in a way that the horse can understand. When you understand how your horse works on the inside and apply this knowledge in an incremental and consistent way, the foundation you set up becomes a reliable partnership.  When this happens, confidence replaces insecurity.  Clarity replaces confusion.

When the basics are a woven into the normal pace and details of its daily life -- not only a part of specific drills or boring routines -- the horse begins to recognize and understand the intent behind the feel coming from the person.  This gives him confidence and from there he is likely to stop questioning the person and to follow the feel of the person's lead and leadership.  

When these basics have become a regular practice, the connection between person and horse becomes stronger.   The resulting partnership is based on trust that extends far in both directions. Ultimately, in its refinement, the mutual trust and reciprocal feel between a horse and a person is part of a maneuver that is born the instant it is shared.

In most cases, it is necessary that the coach understand how to teach and how to apply feel in order for the student's relationship to his or her horse develop at the right pace and in the best way.  The student, meanwhile, must invest whatever time is needed to learn all there is to know about the specific needs of the horse.  This requires limitless patience.  

It is also important to be crystal clear about the importance of making mistakes.  

It is impossible to avoid mistakes. We all make them, so we must accept them.  In order to do this, we must cultivate a calm, non-judgmental attitude toward our mistakes.  It is vital that we begin to view errors as opportunities for growth, for greater closeness, and for an ever stronger bond.  Our calm, even eager, anticipation of the next mistake eases tension, soon transforming both the horse and the person in unexpected ways.  

I know this to be true from my own experience and when this happens, everything about the friendship is refreshed . . .  it becomes deeper and a lot more fun!

 

Safer Western Riding is now possible, thanks to fast-release Western Stirrups

 

You have one head, and you are worth it! 

 

 www.breakawaystirrups.com 

 

Finally!  Someone has made an atractive looking, practical and professional safety stirrup that guarantees you won't get dragged by your horse if you fall off and cannot get your foot out of the stirrup.

I encourage you to call or write to the men who invented and manufacture these life-saving stirrups. Mike and Jake McCoy at the BREAKAWAY STIRRUP COMPANY  in Laurel, Montana . 

This forward-looking safety-minded people designed an ingenious mechanism that does not allow your foot to get hung up when you are roping, cutting, jumping, penning, pleasure riding or starting colts!  

 

MY GOAL IS TO HELP YOU LEARN HOW TO RIDE WELL, and HAVE A LOT OF FUN DOING IT.  
RIDING IS A RISKY BUSINESS AND FALLS ARE SOMETIMES INEVITABLE, you must PROTECT YOUR SELF FROM AN ACCIDENTAL DRAGGING. 

The McCoys have extended the generous offer of a three-month payment plan to all my students.  This is incredible opportunity makes it possible for many people who, otherwise, would not have the chance to purchase them.
I WANT PEOPLE TO LEARN ALL THEY CAN ABOUT RIDING ALL SORTS OF HORSES. WE HAVE A GOOD TIME RIDING, AND IT HIS IS DUE IN LARGE PART TO THE PEACE OF MIND THAT COMES FROM KNOWING THAT WHEN YOU GET IN A WRECK YOUR FOOT WILL COME FREE FROM THE STIRRUP AND THE HORSE.

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Driving to town? Most people fasten on a seat belt. Playing a little ice hockey? Football? Fencing? Face guards and helmets are donned and the game is on!

  More bull and bronc riders than ever before now wear protective chest plates and a helmet.

Why? Their children and wives want to go out for a meal together after the show...and onward into their lives - - - healthy, happy and in one piece!

Riders . . .  check out the McCoys and their safety stirrups for men, women and children. For sport, recreation and show. Many styles and all sizes!

Sincerely,

Leslie Desmond, friends of Leslie Desmond and their students who have all fallen clear of a horse thanks to breakaway stirrups from STI.

 

 

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*****

 

YOU HAVE ONE HEAD! 

 

Thanks for reading this....